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Fast Day #8: Veggies all the way: Shirataki Noodle Summer Salad - 232 calories


Shirataki Noodle Summer Salad

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With my out of town guest out of town once again, I am able to go back to my regular routine and make some food for my Fast Day. With our spat of nice weather, I felt like a salad for my first meal. Due to poor communication with my hubby I didn't have any leftover steak by the time I made this salad. Ah well, I subbed in an egg for protein.

I riffed this salad from a Korean-style Soba Noodle Salad  post from one of my favorite blogs, Focus: Snap: Eat, with a few changes. His salad was much prettier than mine though. And I'm bummed that I forgot to get cucumbers for my salad because cucumbers would have helped to balance the tart dressing.


Shirataki Noodle Summer Salad: 232 calories

Ingredients:

  • 223 g Romaine Lettuce (39 cal)
  • 28 g Microgreens (5 calories)
  • 25 g Kimchi (20 calories)
  • 1 package of House Brand Shirataki Noodles, Spaghetti style (40 calories)
  • 1 boiled egg (63 calories)
  • 31 g Dressing (65 calories)
For Dressing: 2.1 calories per gram

  • 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar (40 calories)
  • 3 t sesame oil (120 calories)
  • 1 T sugar (49 calories)
  • 1 T gochuchang (Korean hot pepper paste, 20 calories)
 

Instructions:

  1. Rinse shirataki noodles well with hot water. Drain well.
  2. Boil egg - place cold egg into cold water, bring to a boil, cover, turn off heat, and let siton stove for 6 mintues.
  3. Wash and cut lettuce and microgreens. Drain well.
  4. Mix salad dressing ingredients, whisk well.
  5. Cut kimchi into small pieces. I wish I would have cut these even smaller than I did - maybe into a quarter inch dice.
  6. Peel and dice egg.
  7. Dress greens and noodles with desired amount of dressing. Toss well. 
  8. Arrange greens and toppings into a large bowl
This is a HUMUNGOUS salad. I normally wouldn't have used so much lettuce but it was easier to just use a whole head of Romaine and not have any leftovers.

Also, the original recipe called for more oil but I didn't want to use my calories that way. So the dressing is very, tart but I like it that way. You can always reduce the amount of vinegar for a more subtle flavor. I did end up sprinkling some salt on the salad.

If I had more calories to spare, I would have increased the amount of kimchi. It added a nice pungent punch to the salad that was extremely good. As picky as I am about Asian ingredients, I thought the Trader Joe's Kimchi was very good - not too stinky but not wimpy. I'd buy it again. The only downside is that I wish this came with a resealable zip closure.

Trader Joe's Kimchi: good flavor, great sized package

There was so much going on in this salad, the noodles provided a different level of texture that offset the crunchiness of the lettuce. I didn't put enough dressing on the noodles but after a while I really like the blandness of the noodles to offset the tartness of the dressing.

But the star of this show was the egg. I am so glad that I didn't have any steak left because the egg was so good. The yolk blended with the dressing to make it extra creamy. In fact if I do this again, I'll mash the egg yolk directly in the dressing. The egg whites not only provided some protein to the dish, but they soaked up a lot of dressing and were lovely pops of flavors. I'm actually thinking of making faux pickled eggs with the rest of the dressing! If you have extra calories to spare tossing in another egg white would be a great idea.

It was a struggle to finish this whole salad in one sitting. If I wasn't trying to make this dish look pretty for pictures, I would have tossed all the ingredients together and saved half of the salad for later. Once you put the dressing on any salad, the clock starts to tick on it's shelf life.

Lessons learned:
  1. Use less lettuce
  2. Use more eggs and kimchi
  3. Blend 1 egg yolk in with dressing to add richness
  4. Use a salad spinner to dry off greens and noodles
Thanks for the inspiration Ben!!!

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